Homeless and Hungry

Wild cats are wary and elusive by nature, preferring to avoid people whenever possible. But as they lose ground to logging, farming, herding, and other human developments, they’re forced out of the safety of their homes.
Help us protect critical cat habitat.

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33

Miles per hour a lioness can sprint.

A lioness chases a zebra

Wild cats prefer to avoid humans, but as they lose ground to expanding developments they're forced into contact with people, often resulting in deadly clashes.

 

 

Deadly Clashes

As their homes disappear, so do the food sources they rely on. With nothing left to eat, wild cats prey on livestock in desperation, leading to fatal clashes with local communities. It’s a devastating situation where no one wins.

Any conservation effort requires support from local communities if it’s going to succeed. But when livestock animals are killed, local support declines. If peaceful solutions can’t be found, quickly, we’ll lose several iconic cats species, including lions, tigers, and leopards forever.

 

 

Communities living peacefully alongside wildlife

LEFT: In Africa, domesticated cattle are an important part of Masai and Samburu livelihood. By helping local people proactively protect their herds from big cats, we can create peace for both species. RIGHT: Samburu tribeswomen.

140

Pounds of food a lion can eat at one time.

Peaceful Solutions

Understanding local attitudes toward—and challenges living with—wild cats is essential for finding peaceful and sustainable solutions. Working with the communities who coexist with cat populations, we develop a balanced approach that accounts for the needs of the cats and the people who live alongside them.

In addition to helping farmers and herders build predator-proof corrals, our teams teach local people how to supplement their income by selling traditional handicrafts, like felt rugs and jewelry. We also provide training and support for natural resource management agencies that oversee wild cat habitat in multiple countries.

Outreach and education are crucial components of successful conservation efforts. By empowering and inspiring people who live alongside cats, we can give both species a brighter future.

 

 

A cheetah thermometer demonstrates fundraising  progress

 

 

To protect wild cats and ensure their survival, we’ve launched the Global Cat Conservancy™. Help us raise $250,000 by June 30, to kick off this lifesaving effort.

Your tax-deductible gift to the Global Cat Conservancy™ will help fight poaching and wildlife trafficking, protect humans and wild cats from deadly clashes with each other, and help scientists find cures for life-threatening diseases that are devastating wild cat populations.

 

 

Cool Cats Save Lives

 

 

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A cheetah in the wild